Conference Schedule

 

OVERVIEW

 

THURSDAY, APRIL 24

 

9:00 am – 10:00 am: Breakfast Plenary Presentation

10:05 am – 12:30 pm:  Morning Workshop Sessions (two 75-minute or one 2 ½ hour workshops)

12:40 pm – 1:50 pm:  Lunch Plenary Presentation

2:00 pm – 4:25 pm:  Afternoon Workshop Sessions (two 75-minute or one 2 ½ hour workshops)

 

FRIDAY, APRIL 25

 

9:00 am – 10:00 am: Breakfast Plenary Presentation

10:05 am – 12:30 pm:  Morning Workshop Sessions (two 75-minute or one 2 ½ hour workshops)

12:40 pm – 1:50 pm:  Lunch Plenary Presentation

2:00 pm – 4:25 pm:  Afternoon Workshop Sessions (two 75-minute or one 2 ½ hour workshops)  

 


 

THURSDAY DETAILS

 

Breakfast Plenary Presentation: 9:00 am – 10:00 am

 

Healing the Heart of the Community with Patricia Moore Harbour, Ed.D., Center for Quality Education and Break Through Coaching

Our youth are the heart of our communities. They are an unimagined resource for their community’s development, work-ability and quality of life. This is true now and in the future. You, community educators and mentors, are a decisive benefit for the education and development of youth.

AUDIENCE: All

 

Morning 2.5 Hour Workshop Sessions: 10:05 am – 12:30 pm

 

Mentoring 101: Reaching for the Top, Striving to Become a Gold Medal Program with Stephanie Inyama and Stacey Savelle, CARS

This full day workshop (continuing after lunch) will provide the basics for designing, operating or refreshing your mentoring program by incorporating the Elements of Effective Practice with experiential learning, ways to overcome challenges and celebrate triumphs. Join us in this Championship Arena for qualifying rounds that include applying an array of exceptional practices to raise your program to new heights. Learn the importance of planning, creativity and skillful execution. Work in teams to attain Gold Medal status!

AUDIENCE: Early in the Field and Experienced in the Field

 

Community Educators: Educating and Developing Youth with Patricia Moore Harbour, Center for Quality Education, and Becky Cooper, Friends for Youth

At the core of research findings that have been disseminated by the Kettering Foundation over the past few years is a commitment to communities of learning for youth characterized by adult-child mentoring relationships and all-encompassing community engagement in youth development. This session is designed to articulate the Community Educators concept, its natural connections to youth mentoring, and how to enhance both community and mentoring efforts with this combined approach. Both panelists will discuss how education is broader than just schooling and the role of mentoring in youth development and learning, which ultimately fosters community development. The facilitators will lead participants in thoughtful, concrete discussions on various forms of citizens as educators, drawing on the expertise in the room. Attendees will leave with new information about how citizens can transform community and how, together, we can take collaborative action through our existing efforts to support youth in our own communities.

AUDIENCE: Early in the Field and Experienced in the Field

 

SAFE Training: Prioritizing Youth Safety with Research-Based Screening Practices with Sarah Kremer, Friends for Youth, and Clara Carter, Management Consultant Services

This presentation will focus on the recommended tools and approaches from the resource SAFE (Screening Applicants for Effectiveness): Guidelines to Prevent Child Molestation in Mentoring and Youth-Serving Organizations that many programs already use in screening and assessing their volunteers. We will review the relevance and purpose of the screening and monitoring process and recommended tools and protocol to implement in your program. Additionally, participants will have the opportunity to delve deeper into how to use both subjective (impressions from interactions) and objective (records, written application, online profile) components to make the best decision. Research gathered in the writing of the Mentor Screening and Youth Protection chapter for the 2nd edition of the Handbook of Youth Mentoring will be also reviewed.

AUDIENCE: All

 

Morning 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 10:05 am – 11:15 am

 

Effective Match Supervision with Donnovan Karber, Christian Association of Youth Mentoring

Mentoring works as a strong trusting relationship is developed between a mentor and a protégé. It is through a trusting relationship that change occurs. While some mentors naturally develop trust with their protégés, most mentors need supervision. Good supervision results in higher quality long-term matches. Research shows that longer matches yield more positive outcomes for the youth and the mentor. This presentation, focusing on non-faith-based youth mentoring program practices, brings together the evidenced-based research regarding match supervision as well as over ten years of practice wisdom.

AUDIENCE: Early in the Field and Experienced in the Field

 

Mentoring as a Profession with Gary Clemons, Friends of the Children

Participants will be given the opportunity to expand their understanding of a “mentor” to include full-time, salaried professionals who work one-on-one with each child within a research-based program that lasts at least 12.5 years. From kindergarten through high school graduation, Friends of the Children will be there – no matter what. This session discusses FOTC’s innovative program model, presents the organization’s history, how the model works, and the children served. The presenter will discuss FOTC’s impact and evaluation research to date, as well as the need for this type of model given the work of other mentoring organizations serving similar populations of children. The paid vs. volunteer mentor issue (i.e., whether and how receiving a salary changes the mentoring relationship and the value of the social return on investment) will be challenged. The presentation will conclude by discussing natural partnerships in the social service field necessary to scale future impact.

AUDIENCE: All

  

Morning 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 11:20 am – 12:30 pm

 

Targeted Mentor Recruitment Strategies with Heather Hicks, The Buddy Program

This presentation discusses successful strategies for recruiting volunteers in order to increase the quality and quantity of new applicants, including the art of good follow-up to new inquiries and ideas on how to partner with local businesses and utilize your current networks of support to promote volunteerism. This session will provide attendees with new recruitment ideas and tools to help shrink their list of mentees waiting to be matched with a mentor. The workshop will have a proponent of audience interaction, where attendees will break into small groups to brainstorm new recruitment ideas using the techniques provided. We will touch on the opportunity to use the recruitment process as a pre-screening tool, a strategy that The Buddy Program has found to be successful. In the past year, the program nearly doubled new volunteer applications from the previous year through a multitude of recruitment activities we will also discuss.

AUDIENCE: Early in the Field and Experienced in the Field

 

Using Digital Media to Build Community, Create Space to Reflect, and Evaluate Your Program with Ellen Mahoney, Sea Change Mentoring

Participants will learn how to use digital media such Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook and Tumblr to enhance a sense of community for their mentoring community, collect data in order to understand the health of the program and develop creative opportunities for mentees and mentors to deepen and reflect their experiences together. We will share specific applications of digital media, how to adapt these to the specific needs of mentoring programs and the legal and ethical parameters within which to work.

AUDIENCE: All

  

Lunch Plenary Presentation: 12:40 pm – 1:50 pm

 

The Role of Mentoring in Interrupting the School-to-Prison Pipeline with James Anderson, Anti-Recidivism Coalition, and Roger Jarjoura, American Institutes for Research

This plenary session will offer reflections from two men with direct experience using mentoring with youth in prison. The presenters bring a broad perspective that comes from having taken a variety of different roles in such mentoring initiatives, including mentee, mentor, program developer, program administrator, researcher, recruiter, advocate and trainer. This discussion will focus on how mentoring relationships and the wider mentoring field work to interrupt the cradle-to-prison pipeline and how the impact of those efforts can be enhanced.

AUDIENCE: All

 

Afternoon 2.5 Hour Workshop Sessions: 2:00 – 4:25 pm

 

Mentoring 101: Reaching for the Top, Striving to Become a Gold Medal Program with Stephanie Inyama and Stacey Savelle, CARS

This full day workshop (see the Morning Workshop Sessions) will provide the basics for designing, operating or refreshing your mentoring program by incorporating the Elements of Effective Practice with experiential learning, ways to overcome challenges and celebrate triumphs. Join us in this Championship Arena for qualifying rounds that include applying an array of exceptional practices to raise your program to new heights. Learn the importance of planning, creativity and skillful execution. Work in teams to attain Gold Medal status!

AUDIENCE: Early in the Field and Experienced in the Field

 

The Secret to Empowering Girls: Psst… It’s Not a Secret with Tanya Beat, Tanya Beat Coaching

Adults will learn three basic coaching skills that are a solid foundation for working and/or volunteering with teen girls that allows for an empowering relationship. The skills are presented with hands-on activities to allow participants a deeper understanding of how these skills apply to their own lives. These skills include the three levels of listening, what are “powerful questions” and how to use them; and how coaching from the perspective of “youth as partners” empowers the mentoring relationship.

AUDIENCE: Early in the Field

 

BRIDGE to Adulthood: Mentoring Strategies for Older Youth with Tommy McClam and Kelly Belmonte, YouthBuild USA

The White House Council for Community Solutions refers to the 6.7 million “youth between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither enrolled in school nor participating in the labor market” as “opportunity youth.” The goal of this session is to provide mentoring practitioners and advocates with practical and effective methods to support these young people transitioning to adulthood. Through interactive lecture and use of video and online demonstration, participants in this session will explore the hopes, dreams, and challenges of “opportunity youth”; identify strategies for mentoring older youth that can be applied in local programs; and gain access to a rich mine of available resources for mentoring a young person on the bridge to adulthood.

AUDIENCE: All

 

Recruiting Black and Latino Mentors: Target Marketing and Lessons Learned with Brian Sales

This workshop focuses on highly effective programmatic strategies when recruiting African-American and Latino-American mentors. Participants will share, learn and discuss common challenges with recruiting Black and Latino mentors. In addition, mentoring organizations will learn promising practices by examining the strength and limitations of their program mentoring services within the context of their mentoring model. Lastly, participants will be introduced to a target marketing approach that utilizes cultural competent messaging by using current examples of marketing strategies that target the Latino-American and African-American communities.

 

AUDIENCE: All

 

 

 

Afternoon 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 2:00 pm – 3:10 pm

 

Closing the Generational Gap: Promoting Intergenerational Understanding with Clara Carter, Management Consultant Services

Although some generational differences have always existed, todays generational gaps in mentoring attributed to challenges that sometimes arise in mentoring relationships, particularly with respect to such matters as musical tastes, choice of style in clothing, means of communicating and sense of personal values. Researchers in the field of mentoring see this gap as sometimes a barrier to strong intergenerational relationships, social “ embeddedness”, and “generativity” (the passing down of a positive legacy) through mentoring that exist in cross-generational interactions. However, attention to mentoring interventions is resulting in bridging the generation gap with success. The presenter will  share with participants why things do not always go well in a mentoring relationship based on the basic assumptions that underlie adultism. While this workshop is designed to address how to close the generational gap that can occur in a mentoring relationship, the presenter will also share with participants why things do not always go well.

AUDIENCE: All

 

Afternoon 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 3:15 pm – 4:25 pm

 

The Diana Screen®: An Effective Screening Tool to Reduce Boundary Violations and Sexual Risk to Children and Teens with Whitney Gabriel, Abel Screening, Inc.

Just like all youth-serving organizations, mentoring programs must do all that they can to keep kids safe from those who pose a risk to their sexual safety. Unfortunately some people applying to volunteer in youth-serving programs fail to understand adult/child sexual boundaries and others specifically target such programs because they have a sexual interest in children and teens. Even organizations knowledgeable about child sexual abuse and its prevention are vulnerable. People who pose a sexual risk to children use a variety of techniques to gain entrance into youth-serving organizations. They are adept at passing standard screening methods and manipulating the need to fill open positions. This workshop will examine a scientifically-valid, computerized, screening tool that has proven effective at screening the general population for sexual risk to children and teens. The experiences and dilemmas of programs using The Diana Screen will be discussed along with research on the screen’s acceptability.

AUDIENCE: All

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FRIDAY DETAILS

 

Breakfast Plenary Presentation: 9:00 am – 10:00 am

 

Opening Up Mentoring Conversations About Important Difficult Conversations with Debra Chasnoff, GroundSpark

Youth today are very impacted by name-calling, bullying, anti-gay and other bias-related stigma, and the pressure to conform to gender norms. If their family structure differs from the stereotypical norm,  they may face other pressures from peers, as well. The presenter has interviewed hundreds of K-12 students to create several highly acclaimed documentary films about these issues. She will share excerpts from Straightlaced—How Gender’s Got Us All Tied Up about how teens are grappling with gender and sexuality pressures; Let’s Get Real about young teens’ experiences with name-calling and bullying; and That’s a Family! about family diversity from a kids’ perspective—shown at the White House and embraced by scores of national children’s advocacy, education, and civil rights organizations. The insights from these films illuminate how students are grappling with the intersection between school climate and respect for diversity and can help mentors open up communication with their mentees about these critical social and psychological challenges.

AUDIENCE: All

 

Morning 2.5 Hour Workshop Sessions: 10:05 am – 12:30 pm

 

You Can Do More: Research and Resources to Better Serve LGBTQ Youth in Your Mentoring Program with Christian Rummell, American Institutes for Research

Many Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (LGBTQ) youth face intense obstacles as they come out and share their identity with others. Bullying and harassment in schools, challenges with parental and peer acceptance, and heightened risks for depression and suicide are unfortunate reminders of a group of young people in need of support. Although these obstacles exist, many youth advocates, including mentoring programs and mentors do not know how to help. This session will provide participants with awareness of the risk factors facing LGBTQ youth, research on how mentors can make a difference, and targeted and updated resources that can create inclusive and supportive opportunities for this population.

AUDIENCE: Experienced in the Field and Expert in the Field

 

Training New Mentors with Judy Taylor, CARS

Are you conducting mentor training at your program? There is more to delivering an effective mentor training session than just sharing information. This session addresses what it takes to pull off an effective mentor training experience, including preparation, subject selection, delivery options and exercises, and follow up considerations. Leave with information and tools useful for helping you meet the challenge of becoming a great mentor trainer.

AUDIENCE: Early in the Field

 

Preparing to Mentor Adjudicated Youth with Clara Carter, Management Consultant Services

Youth involved in the Juvenile Justice System are, in many ways, like other youth served by mentoring programs. Their lives also include risk factors such as poverty, school failure and inadequate or inconsistent parenting. However their ability to cope with the stigma that comes with involvement in the criminal justice system makes them members of a unique targeted population for mentoring programs. A challenge for program staff is to strike a balance between giving mentors realistic expectations in presenting circumstances and the possible difficulties that come with the territory of working with at-risk young people, while presenting this task as also hopeful and rewarding. This workshop has been carefully designed to be delivered in a way that maintains that balance. The topics covered will include human development, family dynamics, risk and protective factors in the lives of adjudicated youth.

AUDIENCE: Early in the Field and Experienced in the Field

 

Mentoring Youth Who May Have Experienced Trauma with Laurie Vargas and Leslie Hu, San Francisco Unified School District Mentoring for Success

Our youth live in diverse environments and may have experienced a traumatic event in their short lives. Trauma can have a profound effect on a child/adolescent’s brain and how the environment interacts with the child/adolescent can impact the healing process. A child/adolescent who has experienced multiple traumas may have a difficult time regulating their emotional response. Children and adolescents respond to trauma differently than adults do. During this session, we will review what trauma is, provide an understanding to how trauma effects brain development, and provide strategies that mentors can use with their young person that can promote a healing environment.

AUDIENCE: All

 

Morning 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 10:05 am – 11:15 am

 

Youth Initiated Mentoring: Teaching Youth to Identify, Recruit, and Draw Upon Adult Support with Sarah Schwartz and Stella Kanchewa, Center for Evidenced Based Mentoring

Youth Initiated Mentoring (YIM) is a new model of mentoring in which youth recruit mentors from within their existing social network. Data from the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program indicates that YIM is a promising strategy to support vulnerable adolescents, potentially creating more enduring and ecologically valid mentoring relationships, while mobilizing internal social capital within communities. Moreover, the model may allow youth to acquire the skills to be able to recruit mentors throughout their lives. In this session, researchers will present the results of a national, 3-year study of YIM in the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program. They will also share preliminary data on an adaptation of Youth Initiated Mentoring, consisting of an eight-week group intervention designed to teach youth how to identify, recruit, and draw on the support of caring adults and mentors. Implications for mentoring programs, including how strategies and principles of YIM can be integrated into traditional mentoring programs, will be explored.

AUDIENCE: Experienced in the Field and Expert in the Field

 

Morning 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 11:20 am – 12:30 pm

 

Teaching and Advocacy in Mentoring: Emerging Practices of the OJJDP Mentoring Enhancement Demonstration Program with Tom Keller and Kay Logan, Portland State University

The Mentoring Enhancement Demonstration Program (MEDP) funded in 2012 by the Library of Congress for the U.S. Department of Justice/Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention includes ten collaborative partnerships (a total of 32 mentoring program sites) that were selected to implement new strategies that included: (1) incorporating advocacy or teaching roles for mentors; (2) providing targeted pre-match and ongoing training to mentors to support advocacy and teaching; and (3) providing ongoing support to mentors around enhanced mentor roles. American Institutes for Research (AIR) and its partners are conducting a five-year randomized controlled study of MEDP. In this workshop we will discuss the way in which the collaborative sites are defining advocacy and teaching activities for mentors and their different approaches to enhance the teaching and advocacy roles of mentors. We also highlight the lessons and implications of these innovations as they are put into program practice. 

AUDIENCE: All

 

Lunch Keynote Presentation: 12:40 pm – 1:50 pm

 

How to Culturally Tailor Mentoring Programs to Better Serve Youth of Color with Bernadette Sanchez, Ph.D.

The purpose of this presentation is to equip mentors and staff with strategies for becoming attuned to race, ethnicity and culture of their youth. Research shows that youth of color are less likely to report natural mentors in their lives compared to White youth, and as such, mentoring programs are developed to compensate for these lack of mentors. Given that many mentoring programs serve racially/ethnically diverse youth, it is important to think about what aspects of race/ethnicity matter. Dr. Sanchez will discuss two ways in which mentoring staff can culturally tailor their programs to meet the needs of racially/ethnically diverse youth: by making surface structure and deep structure adaptations. Dr. Sanchez will also provide examples of each. Making these adaptations will be a first step in creating positive changes in our youth.

AUDIENCE: All

 

Afternoon 2.5 Hour Workshop Sessions: 2:00 – 4:25 pm

 

Tools and Tips for Developing Group Mentoring with Jerry Sherk, CARS

This workshop will provide an overview of how to design, implement, and facilitate a group mentoring program. The trainer will begin by describing the two basic models for group mentoring – formal and informal. While focusing on formal group mentoring, the facilitator will address the matching process for mentors and mentees, and developing group rules. He will also explain “the flow of activities” concept for a curriculum-based effort, and how to put together an activity plan for each session. Examples of specific group mentoring curriculum will be provided, including an effective sharing process called “Good News/Bad News.” Participants will leave this workshop with a better understanding of how to put together a group mentoring effort, and how to prepare mentors to be successful when working with this model.

AUDIENCE: All

 

Empowering Mentees for Successful Matches with Dustianne North, CARS

It is common, even in the most sophisticated mentor programs, to focus on training mentors but seldom extend the same attention to orienting and preparing mentees. To ensure that mentees in your program feel empowered and can contribute to the success of their matches, establishing a connection with them early on – and continuing to communicate with them throughout their matches – are critical. There are also, of course, safety reasons to keep open communication between program staff and mentees. We will explore some fun and interactive mentee training activities, agendas, and important topics. We’ll also discuss recruitment, screening, training, matching, supervision, and closure strategies aimed specifically at mentees.

AUDIENCE: All

 

Results of Law Enforcement and Community Based Organization Transformative Mentoring Program with John Ducksworth, Fedcap Rehabilitative Services, Inc., and Rosanne Placencia-Knepper, Community Connections for Youth; Panel: Clinton Lacey, Assistant Deputy of Probation, and LaLisa Reid, Probation Officer, New York City; Darren Collins, mentor; and Phillip Richards and Dejohn Smith, mentees

This presentation will show what can happen for youth and young adults when a traditional law enforcement agency partners with community based organizations to identify non-traditional credible messengers (persons who have had various types of personal contacts with the criminal justice system themselves) to mentor early offenders. The presentation will include case studies, empirical data, best practices, and a panel discussion involving a mentee, mentor, and a senior probation officer.

AUDIENCE: Early in the Field and Experienced in the Field

  

Afternoon 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 2:00 pm – 3:10 pm

 

How to Evaluate the Impact of Mentoring: A Case Study with Armando Jinich, Maria Garza, and David Moreno, Peraj Mexico

Peraj is a mentoring program in Mexico in which junior and senior undergraduate students do community service as mentors of 5th and 6th graders of public schools, during a full school year, meeting twice weekly at the universities. An evaluation instrument was designed and proven to have high reliability for measuring drop-out risk. It was applied using pre and post-test to some 2,000 mentees and 1,000 youth from a control group. The results show a statistically significant decrease in risk for Peraj mentees and an increase for non-mentees. In this presentation we describe both the mentoring program and the methodology used to construct the evaluation instrument and measure its reliability. We also show how the program was designed to combine a number of mentoring strategies that have been proven successful and how it was implemented so as to be easily replicable without losing its strength which is based on accepted best practices.

AUDIENCE: Experienced in the Field and Expert in the Field

 

Dreams Can Come True: Planning for Life After High School with Your Mentor by Your Side with Amy Cannata, Education Northwest

Would your mentors appreciate tools to help their mentees learn about options for careers and education after high school? Do you have students who are motivated to go to college or technical school but don’t know where to start when faced with a mountain of websites, booklets, and advice? Join us for a multimedia session to explore the elements and attitudes needed for a successful transition from high school. This session will showcase online content, downloadable extension activities, and a planning workbook for mentoring pairs.

AUDIENCE: All

 

Afternoon 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 3:15 pm – 4:25 pm

 

A Research Study of Check & Connect, A Mentoring Program with Nicole Fabrikant, Darcy Cabral, and Carl Sumi, SRI International

We will outline the Check & Connect mentorship intervention (created by the University of Minnesota’s Institute on Community Integration), including a discussion of how it is different from many traditional mentoring models. We will also discuss our research of Check & Connect, as implemented in a local school district (by us) as part of a study funded by the US Department of Education. The presentation’s two areas of focus will be describing what Check & Connect is (and how it is different from other types of mentoring models), and how we are conducting our research about this mentorship intervention.  We will discuss our research design, the outcomes we are looking at, and how we are measuring these outcomes. The discussion will include considerations we had when choosing our methodology. We will also present some baseline data from first year results, and a discussion of the data. The discussion will include ample time for questions and answers.

AUDIENCE: Experienced in the Field and Expert in the Field

 

Engaging STEM Professionals as Mentors: Training and Supporting Corporate Volunteers with Camile Stone and Gavin Nesom, We Teach Science

STEM professionals are an untapped resource of mentors who as caring adults can be strong role models well suited to volunteer in the classroom. The natural connection point in science and math gives volunteers an enthusiasm which is channeled by thoughtful training and ongoing feedback to guide students to see the relevance of STEM outside the classroom. The program director and a seasoned mentor will give strategies to create a systematic and cohesive approach to STEM mentoring with high student satisfaction, high mentor retention, and improved academics. Working with corporations as partners, best practices to train and support industry professionals to become successful mentors, common pitfalls, and strategies for oversight will all be discussed.

AUDIENCE: Early in the Field

 

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AUDIENCE LEVELS

Early in the Field – mentoring professionals who are either new to mentoring or are starting a new program; this material is designed around the basics

Experienced in the Field – mentoring professionals who have been working with youth mentoring or youth-serving programs for at least one year; this material goes beyond the basics and explores deeper levels of understanding for the topics listed

Expert in the Field – mentoring professionals who have been in the field for at least seven years or who have served in a variety of roles within youth mentoring or youth-serving programs; this material requires the ability to process new information and share experiences or knowledge gained from experience

 

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FFY Short Description

Transforming the lives of at-risk youth through the power of mentoring