Conference

  • Boxcover

    Thursday, April 24, and Friday, April 25, 2014

    Oracle Conference Center, Santa Clara, California 


     

    Our sincerest thanks to all attendees, presenters, supporters, and special guests to our annual conference. It was a truly spectacular event and we are grateful for attendees’ enthusiasm, positive energy, eagerness to learn and share, and commitment to the field. Mentoring professionals from across California, the country, and even from a few other countries joined us to participate in the plenary and workshop sessions with focus, commitment, and thoughtfulness.

     

    Quick Stats:

    • 130 participants over 2 days
    • 4 plenary sessions featuring Dr. Bernadette Sanchez as researcher keynote; Debra Chasnoff from GroundSpark; James Anderson from the Anti-Recidivism Coalition and Dr. Roger Jarjoura from AIR; and Dr. Patricia Moore Harbour of Community Educators (see more details from the Keynote & Plenary tab)
    • 26 workshops (view sessions from the Sessions tab)
    • 6 Making A Difference Award honorees
    • 7 winners from our drawing, receiving copies of the Handbook of Youth Mentoring, 2nd Ed., Friends for Youth’s Mentoring Journal, one video and curriculum guide from GroundSpark, Dr. Harbour’s Community Educators, and an iPad Mini, generously donated by a Friends for Youth mentor!

     

    Check out photos from this year’s conference on our Facebook page. 

     

    Look for information about next year’s conference in our summer email updates. Hope you can join us in 2015!


     

    The 2014 National Mentoring Month campaign, Be Someone Who Matters to Someone Who Matters, gets to the heart of mentoring: a positive relationship-based intervention can mean the world of difference to both the mentor and mentee. However, we know from our work that there are distinct ways to prepare and support program participants for maximum effectiveness. With a national average of less than half of mentoring relationships that continue until their expected completion date, we need to continue improving our practices to make sure the rewards outweigh the risks, and that mentoring professionals feel ready to address the inherent challenges with confidence and success. As with every year, we address strategies to make the most of mentoring for staff, program participants, and community supporters. Join us to grow your skills, learn from expert presenters and researchers, and feel supported by your peers. Our goal is for participants to walk away with concrete tools and practical suggestions to easily implement into their new or existing programs, making both attendees and their programs stronger and better able to serve their communities.

     

  • Registration is now closed.

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    Bernadette Sanchez, Ph.D., Keynote Speaker

     

                                                          bsanchez                                        DuBois_Handbook_of_Youth_Mentoring_2ed_72ppiRGB_150pixW

    This year’s conference features Bernadette Sanchez, Ph.D., as Research Keynote Speaker, who will discuss her work involving race, culture, and ethnicity in mentoring relationships. As a contributing author to the Handbook of Youth Mentoring, 2nd ed., and Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series panelist, we are excited to hear more about her important results. 

     

    Plenary Speakers

    Other plenary presentations feature Debra Chasnoff, President of GroundSpark, sharing information about their groundbreaking educational films, and Patricia Moore Harbour, Ed.D., author and champion of the concept of Community Educators. We are also excited to present a conversation between James Anderson from the Anti-Recidivism Campaign and Roger Jarjoura, Ph.D. from the American Institutes for Research, who will be sharing two different experiences of using mentoring with youth in prison.

     

                                 DebraChasnoff      PatHarbour       JamesAnderson     RogerJarjoura

  • OVERVIEW

     

    Registration for both days begins at 8:00 am. Please check in at tables set up in the foyer of the Auditorium and enjoy breakfast. The plenary sessions begin promptly at 9:00 am. After the morning plenary session in the Auditorium on both days, you will go directly to your workshop session, being held in either the Auditorium or the Mansion. The Mansion is a short three-minute walk from the Auditorium across Palm Drive. After either one 2 ½ hour session or two 75-minute sessions, the lunch plenary sessions will be held from 12:40 to 1:50 pm, back in the Auditorium. Afternoon courses of either  one 2 ½ hour session or two 75-minute sessions are from 2:00 until 4:25 pm.

     

    THURSDAY, APRIL 24

     

    8:00 am – 9:00 am: Registration and breakfast

    9:00 am – 10:00 am: Breakfast Plenary Presentation

    10:05 am – 12:30 pm:  Morning Workshop Sessions (two 75-minute or one 2 ½ hour workshops)

    12:40 pm – 1:50 pm:  Lunch Plenary Presentation

    2:00 pm – 4:25 pm:  Afternoon Workshop Sessions (two 75-minute or one 2 ½ hour workshops)

     

    FRIDAY, APRIL 25

     

    8:00 am – 9:00 am: Registration and breakfast

    9:00 am – 10:00 am: Breakfast Plenary Presentation

    10:05 am – 12:30 pm:  Morning Workshop Sessions (two 75-minute or one 2 ½ hour workshops)

    12:40 pm – 1:50 pm:  Lunch Plenary Presentation

    2:00 pm – 4:25 pm:  Afternoon Workshop Sessions (two 75-minute or one 2 ½ hour workshops)  

    4 2014Conf_program_schedule 

  • SESSIONS

    Four plenary sessions and 26 workshop sessions will be offered over the course of two days. Click here to download the conference schedule to see all descriptions and details of the schedule.

    It is not necessary to register for individual workshops. All sessions are open attendance to anyone who has registered and seating is available until the room is full.

    THURSDAY DETAILS

     

    Breakfast Plenary Presentation: 9:00 am – 10:00 am

     

    Healing the Heart of the Community with Patricia Moore Harbour, Ed.D., Center for Quality Education and Break Through Coaching

    Our youth are the heart of our communities. They are an unimagined resource for their community’s development, work-ability and quality of life. This is true now and in the future. You, community educators and mentors, are a decisive benefit for the education and development of youth.

    AUDIENCE: All

    PATRICIA MOORE HARBOUR is an educator, author, speaker, and professional transformative coach. Pat’s life’s work is a commitment to public education and social change. She engages communities, youth, citizens, institutions and organizations in transformative education to shape their own direction, and achieve extraordinary individual and collective results. She is an associate with the Kettering Foundation, a former teacher and assistant superintendent. Pat earned a Doctorate of Education in Education Administration and Policy Studies from The George Peabody College of Education, Vanderbilt University.

     

    Morning 2.5 Hour Workshop Sessions: 10:05 am – 12:30 pm

     

    Mentoring 101: Reaching for the Top, Striving to Become a Gold Medal Program with Stephanie Inyama and Stacey Savelle, CARS

    This full day workshop (continuing after lunch) will provide the basics for designing, operating or refreshing your mentoring program by incorporating the Elements of Effective Practice with experiential learning, ways to overcome challenges and celebrate triumphs. Join us in this Championship Arena for qualifying rounds that include applying an array of exceptional practices to raise your program to new heights. Learn the importance of planning, creativity and skillful execution. Work in teams to attain Gold Medal status!

    AUDIENCE: Early in the Field and Experienced in the Field

    STEPHANIE INYAMA has a 25-year reputation working in nonprofit environments implementing client-based programming and infrastructure enrichment. She developed and implemented mentoring programs for at-risk youth including youth in foster care. As a consultant, Stephanie works to create and enhance collaboration and provide technical support to community-based organizations, schools, and municipalities to increase mentoring, prevention services, and education awareness. She is President of Infinity Mentoring & Education Consultants and a MBA graduate from American Intercontinental University.

    STACEY SAVELLE has been involved in child protection and youth development programs for several decades. Her passion has always been developing and providing services designed to enrich, educate and elevate the lives of children through mentoring and transitional services. Her professional background is in public child welfare, she has served as a County Commissioner and volunteers with the California Youth Connection. She is a consultant, customizing training and intervention approaches for non-profits and governmental entities.

     

    Community Educators: Educating and Developing Youth with Patricia Moore Harbour, Center for Quality Education, and Becky Cooper, Friends for Youth

    At the core of research findings that have been disseminated by the Kettering Foundation over the past few years is a commitment to communities of learning for youth characterized by adult-child mentoring relationships and all-encompassing community engagement in youth development. This session is designed to articulate the Community Educators concept, its natural connections to youth mentoring, and how to enhance both community and mentoring efforts with this combined approach. Both panelists will discuss how education is broader than just schooling and the role of mentoring in youth development and learning, which ultimately fosters community development. The facilitators will lead participants in thoughtful, concrete discussions on various forms of citizens as educators, drawing on the expertise in the room. Attendees will leave with new information about how citizens can transform community and how, together, we can take collaborative action through our existing efforts to support youth in our own communities.

    AUDIENCE: Early in the Field and Experienced in the Field

    PATRICIA MOORE HARBOUR is an educator, author, speaker, and professional transformative coach. Pat’s life’s work is a commitment to public education and social change. She engages communities, youth, citizens, institutions and organizations in transformative education to shape their own direction, and achieve extraordinary individual and collective results. She is an associate with the Kettering Foundation, a former teacher and assistant superintendent. Pat earned a Doctorate of Education in Education Administration and Policy Studies from The George Peabody College of Education, Vanderbilt University.

    REBECCA (BECKY) S. COOPER is Executive Director of Friends for Youth, Inc., and has been with the organization since its creation in 1979. She has a B.A. in Psychology and a M.A. in Education from Stanford University. Ms. Cooper has served on the Governor’s Mentoring Partnership Quality Assurance Standards Committee, and, in 2004, was named one of four “Mentoring Area Experts” by the Center for Applied Research Solutions. Becky co-authored Running a Safe and Effective Mentoring Program and SAFE.

     

    SAFE Training: Prioritizing Youth Safety with Research-Based Screening Practices with Sarah Kremer, Friends for Youth, and Clara Carter, Management Consultant Services

    This presentation will focus on the recommended tools and approaches from the resource SAFE (Screening Applicants for Effectiveness): Guidelines to Prevent Child Molestation in Mentoring and Youth-Serving Organizations that many programs already use in screening and assessing their volunteers. We will review the relevance and purpose of the screening and monitoring process and recommended tools and protocol to implement in your program. Additionally, participants will have the opportunity to delve deeper into how to use both subjective (impressions from interactions) and objective (records, written application, online profile) components to make the best decision. Research gathered in the writing of the Mentor Screening and Youth Protection chapter for the 2nd edition of the Handbook of Youth Mentoring will be also reviewed.

    AUDIENCE: All

    SARAH KREMER is a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor, Board Certified art therapist, and youth mentoring specialist, providing training and developing resources as Program Director at Friends for Youth’s Mentoring Institute. She received her Masters in Art Therapy from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is the author of Mentoring Journal (2007) and lead author for a chapter in the new Handbook of Youth Mentoring. She has presented nationally and internationally, drawing upon her knowledge of adolescent development, creativity, and mentoring. 

    DR. CLARA CARTER, President of Management Consultant Services and a Certified SAFE Trainer, provides technical assistance to youth programs. As the former Director of Training for Maryland Mentoring Partnership, she was instrumental in assisting the state to emerge as a leader in the mentoring movement, an integral component of the state’s social fabric. Recognized as an expert, she is a presenter at numerous conferences. Currently, Clara is coordinating a middle school program sponsored by the United Way of Central Maryland and Procter and Gamble Corporation. 

     

     

    Morning 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 10:05 am – 11:15 am

     

    Effective Match Supervision with Donnovan Karber, Christian Association of Youth Mentoring

    Mentoring works as a strong trusting relationship is developed between a mentor and a protégé. It is through a trusting relationship that change occurs. While some mentors naturally develop trust with their protégés, most mentors need supervision. Good supervision results in higher quality long-term matches. Research shows that longer matches yield more positive outcomes for the youth and the mentor. This presentation, focusing on non-faith-based youth mentoring program practices, brings together the evidenced-based research regarding match supervision as well as over ten years of practice wisdom.

    AUDIENCE: Early in the Field and Experienced in the Field

    DONNOVAN KARBER is the National Field Director for the Christian Association of Youth Mentoring and lives in Wichita, Kansas. Donnovan works with mentoring programs throughout the country and oversees many of CAYM’s Core trainings. He has mentored multiple at-risk youth over the past 17 years. Donnovan has a passion for helping new mentoring ministries get up and running and helping existing ministries become more effective and efficient.

     

    Mentoring as a Profession with Gary Clemons, Friends of the Children

    Participants will be given the opportunity to expand their understanding of a “mentor” to include full-time, salaried professionals who work one-on-one with each child within a research-based program that lasts at least 12.5 years. From kindergarten through high school graduation, Friends of the Children will be there – no matter what. This session discusses FOTC’s innovative program model, presents the organization’s history, how the model works, and the children served. The presenter will discuss FOTC’s impact and evaluation research to date, as well as the need for this type of model given the work of other mentoring organizations serving similar populations of children. The paid vs. volunteer mentor issue (i.e., whether and how receiving a salary changes the mentoring relationship and the value of the social return on investment) will be challenged. The presentation will conclude by discussing natural partnerships in the social service field necessary to scale future impact.

    AUDIENCE: All  

    GARY CLEMONS, the National Program Manager for Friends of the Children, is responsible for program fidelity and implementation in new and existing sites. Prior to becoming the National Program Manager, Gary worked for the Portland chapter for five years in a variety of roles: as professional Friend, Team Leader, and Child Selection Manager. 

     

     

    Morning 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 11:20 am – 12:30 pm

     

    Targeted Mentor Recruitment Strategies with Heather Hicks, The Buddy Program

    This presentation discusses successful strategies for recruiting volunteers in order to increase the quality and quantity of new applicants, including the art of good follow-up to new inquiries and ideas on how to partner with local businesses and utilize your current networks of support to promote volunteerism. This session will provide attendees with new recruitment ideas and tools to help shrink their list of mentees waiting to be matched with a mentor. The workshop will have a proponent of audience interaction, where attendees will break into small groups to brainstorm new recruitment ideas using the techniques provided. We will touch on the opportunity to use the recruitment process as a pre-screening tool, a strategy that The Buddy Program has found to be successful. In the past year, the program nearly doubled new volunteer applications from the previous year through a multitude of recruitment activities we will also discuss.

    AUDIENCE: Early in the Field and Experienced in the Field

    HEATHER HICKS is the Director of Recruitment at the Buddy Program, where she joined in 2005 as Program Coordinator and PR Liaison. She holds a B.A. in Anthropology and Spanish from The University of Michigan and is bilingual in Spanish. She has studied in Spain and Peru and teaches children’s yoga. Heather also directs Lemonade Day Roaring Fork Valley, a national entrepreneurship initiative for K-12 youth. She is a member of the Aspen Toastmasters.

     

    Using Digital Media to Build Community, Create Space to Reflect, and Evaluate Your Program with Ellen Mahoney, Sea Change Mentoring

    Participants will learn how to use digital media such Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook and Tumblr to enhance a sense of community for their mentoring community, collect data in order to understand the health of the program and develop creative opportunities for mentees and mentors to deepen and reflect their experiences together. We will share specific applications of digital media, how to adapt these to the specific needs of mentoring programs and the legal and ethical parameters within which to work.

    AUDIENCE: All

    ELLEN MAHONEY is the founder of Sea Change Mentoring, an online mentoring program for expatriate emerging adults around the world. After her ten-year career in education as a teacher and counselor, she spent 6 years developing the volunteer management and quality control strategies for iMentor. She serves on the Board of Directors for Families in Global Transition (FIGT), is a David C. Pollock Scholar and a 2013 Echoing Green semifinalist. She is based in San Francisco.

     

     

    Lunch Plenary Presentation: 12:40 pm – 1:50 pm

     

    The Role of Mentoring in Interrupting the School-to-Prison Pipeline with James Anderson, Anti-Recidivism Coalition, and Roger Jarjoura, American Institutes for Research

    This plenary session will offer reflections from two men with direct experience using mentoring with youth in prison. The presenters bring a broad perspective that comes from having taken a variety of different roles in such mentoring initiatives, including mentee, mentor, program developer, program administrator, researcher, recruiter, advocate and trainer. This discussion will focus on how mentoring relationships and the wider mentoring field work to interrupt the cradle-to-prison pipeline and how the impact of those efforts can be enhanced.

    AUDIENCE: All

    JAMES ANDERSON is the Program Administrator for the Anti-Recidivism Coalition. Drawing from his own experiences with the juvenile justice system and a desire to support and mentor young people facing similar challenges, Mr. Anderson has become deeply in involved in mentoring others and policy work. James helped in the creation of a California based organization known as the Anti-Recidivism Coalition. Through ARC he has been blessed to help others who have also fallen down the same path he once took. He travels the country frequently to speak at conferences and schools to inspire hope and help raise awareness and give individuals a better perspective on the reasons why juveniles become involved in delinquent behaviors.

    ROGER JARJOURA, Principal Researcher, Health and Social Development Program, American Institutes for Research has over 19 years of experience in developing and evaluating mentoring programs. He designed and evaluated the use of mentoring as a component of juvenile reentry initiatives, and has provided technical assistance for mentoring system-involved youth. Dr. Jarjoura is currently the Project Director for the national evaluation of OJJDP’s Mentoring Enhancement Demonstration Program.  He also supervises the implementation on a multi-state integration of mentoring within juvenile drug court programs.

     

    Afternoon 2.5 Hour Workshop Sessions: 2:00 – 4:25 pm

     

    Mentoring 101: Reaching for the Top, Striving to Become a Gold Medal Program with Stephanie Inyama and Stacey Savelle, CARS

    This full day workshop (see the Morning Workshop Sessions) will provide the basics for designing, operating or refreshing your mentoring program by incorporating the Elements of Effective Practice with experiential learning, ways to overcome challenges and celebrate triumphs. Join us in this Championship Arena for qualifying rounds that include applying an array of exceptional practices to raise your program to new heights. Learn the importance of planning, creativity and skillful execution. Work in teams to attain Gold Medal status!

    AUDIENCE: Early in the Field and Experienced in the Field

    STEPHANIE INYAMA has a 25-year reputation working in nonprofit environments implementing client-based programming and infrastructure enrichment. She developed and implemented mentoring programs for at-risk youth including youth in foster care. As a consultant, Stephanie works to create and enhance collaboration and provide technical support to community-based organizations, schools, and municipalities to increase mentoring, prevention services, and education awareness. She is President of Infinity Mentoring & Education Consultants and a MBA graduate from American Intercontinental University.

    STACEY SAVELLE has been involved in child protection and youth development programs for several decades. Her passion has always been developing and providing services designed to enrich, educate and elevate the lives of children through mentoring and transitional services. Her professional background is in public child welfare, she has served as a County Commissioner and volunteers with the California Youth Connection. She is a consultant, customizing training and intervention approaches for non-profits and governmental entities.

     

    The Secret to Empowering Girls: Psst… It’s Not a Secret with Tanya Beat, Tanya Beat Coaching

    Adults will learn three basic coaching skills that are a solid foundation for working and/or volunteering with teen girls that allows for an empowering relationship. The skills are presented with hands-on activities to allow participants a deeper understanding of how these skills apply to their own lives. These skills include the three levels of listening, what are “powerful questions” and how to use them; and how coaching from the perspective of “youth as partners” empowers the mentoring relationship.

    AUDIENCE: Early in the Field

    TANYA BEAT has been working with girls, young women and professional women for the last ten years and most recently with trainings for teen girls in low-income community on how to create social change projects in their community either “on the ground” or through social media. She is a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach (CPCC) and uses coaching skills to empower participants to truly be in charge of the issues they feel strongly about. Learn more about Tanya via tanyabeat.com. 

     

    BRIDGE to Adulthood: Mentoring Strategies for Older Youth with Tommy McClam and Kelly Belmonte, YouthBuild USA

    The White House Council for Community Solutions refers to the 6.7 million “youth between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither enrolled in school nor participating in the labor market” as “opportunity youth.” The goal of this session is to provide mentoring practitioners and advocates with practical and effective methods to support these young people transitioning to adulthood. Through interactive lecture and use of video and online demonstration, participants in this session will explore the hopes, dreams, and challenges of “opportunity youth”; identify strategies for mentoring older youth that can be applied in local programs; and gain access to a rich mine of available resources for mentoring a young person on the bridge to adulthood.

    AUDIENCE: All

    TOMMY MCCLAM, Director of Mentoring, YouthBuild USA, leads the National Mentoring Alliance, a collaboration of over seventy local YouthBuild programs. As former executive director of the Elim Community Corporation in Buffalo, New York, Tommy oversaw mentoring matches for over 150 urban youth. Tommy has presented widely on the subject of mentoring for numerous organizations including the National Network of Youth Ministry, US Department of Education, and US Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    KELLY BELMONTE, Associate Director of Mentoring, YouthBuild USA provides guidance for mentoring related research, assessment, and technical enhancement projects. More than a decade of youth mentoring experience includes support to YouthBuild, the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, DoD STARBASE, and Amachi. She has presented on mentoring program design and best practices at numerous conferences and training workshops for youth serving programs, including the National Mentoring Summit and Friends for Youth Annual Conferences.

     

    Recruiting Black and Latino Mentors: Target Marketing and Lessons Learned with Brian Sales

    This workshop focuses on highly effective programmatic strategies when recruiting African-American and Latino-American mentors. Participants will share, learn and discuss common challenges with recruiting Black and Latino mentors. In addition, mentoring organizations will learn promising practices by examining the strength and limitations of their program mentoring services within the context of their mentoring model. Lastly, participants will be introduced to a target marketing approach that utilizes cultural competent messaging by using current examples of marketing strategies that target the Latino-American and African-American communities.

    AUDIENCE: All 

    BRIAN SALES is nationally recognized mentoring practice-based expert. Sales has trained hundreds of staff and volunteers extensively in the field of youth development with an emphasis on youth mentoring for organizations like Big Brothers Big Sisters, Boys and Girls Clubs, Amachi, National Guard Youth Challenge, Star base STEM-based group mentoring, YMCA, and several school districts through training and on-site technical assistance. His practical experiences in working with boys of color, college access programs for high school and college-aged youth, along with work in foster care, school-based and community based mentoring, coupled with directing a runaway, homeless, transitional housing program and substance abuse prevention program provide him with a breadth of knowledge in the human services/youth development field.

     

    Afternoon 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 2:00 pm – 3:10 pm

     

    Closing the Generational Gap: Promoting Intergenerational Understanding with Clara Carter, Management Consultant Services

    Although some generational differences have always existed, todays generational gaps in mentoring attributed to challenges that sometimes arise in mentoring relationships, particularly with respect to such matters as musical tastes, choice of style in clothing, means of communicating and sense of personal values. Researchers in the field of mentoring see this gap as sometimes a barrier to strong intergenerational relationships, social “ embeddedness”, and “generativity” (the passing down of a positive legacy) through mentoring that exist in cross-generational interactions. However, attention to mentoring interventions is resulting in bridging the generation gap with success. The presenter will  share with participants why things do not always go well in a mentoring relationship based on the basic assumptions that underlie adultism. While this workshop is designed to address how to close the generational gap that can occur in a mentoring relationship, the presenter will also share with participants why things do not always go well.

    AUDIENCE: All

    DR. CLARA CARTER, President of Management Consultant Services and a Certified SAFE Trainer, provides technical assistance to youth programs. As the former Director of Training for Maryland Mentoring Partnership, she was instrumental in assisting the state to emerge as a leader in the mentoring movement, an integral component of the state’s social fabric. Recognized as an expert, she is a presenter at numerous conferences. Currently, Clara is coordinating a middle school program sponsored by the United Way of Central Maryland and Procter and Gamble Corporation. 

     

    Afternoon 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 3:15 pm – 4:25 pm

     

    The Diana Screen®: An Effective Screening Tool to Reduce Boundary Violations and Sexual Risk to Children and Teens with Whitney Gabriel, Abel Screening, Inc.

    Just like all youth-serving organizations, mentoring programs must do all that they can to keep kids safe from those who pose a risk to their sexual safety. Unfortunately some people applying to volunteer in youth-serving programs fail to understand adult/child sexual boundaries and others specifically target such programs because they have a sexual interest in children and teens. Even organizations knowledgeable about child sexual abuse and its prevention are vulnerable. People who pose a sexual risk to children use a variety of techniques to gain entrance into youth-serving organizations. They are adept at passing standard screening methods and manipulating the need to fill open positions. This workshop will examine a scientifically-valid, computerized, screening tool that has proven effective at screening the general population for sexual risk to children and teens. The experiences and dilemmas of programs using The Diana Screen will be discussed along with research on the screen’s acceptability.

    AUDIENCE: All

    WHITNEY GABRIEL, J.D. is the National Director of Child Safety for Abel Screening, Inc. She is also a board member and former executive director of the Child Molestation Research & Prevention Institute. Ms. Gabriel is an authorized facilitator of the Stewards of Children sexual abuse prevention training program for adults. A member of the State Bar of California, Ms. Gabriel formerly represented plaintiffs in employment-related discrimination and harassment lawsuits.

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    FRIDAY DETAILS

     

    Breakfast Plenary Presentation: 9:00 am – 10:00 am

     

    Opening Up Mentoring Conversations About Important Difficult Conversations with Debra Chasnoff, GroundSpark

    Youth today are very impacted by name-calling, bullying, anti-gay and other bias-related stigma, and the pressure to conform to gender norms. If their family structure differs from the stereotypical norm,  they may face other pressures from peers, as well. The presenter has interviewed hundreds of K-12 students to create several highly acclaimed documentary films about these issues. She will share excerpts from Straightlaced—How Gender’s Got Us All Tied Up about how teens are grappling with gender and sexuality pressures; Let’s Get Real about young teens’ experiences with name-calling and bullying; and That’s a Family! about family diversity from a kids’ perspective—shown at the White House and embraced by scores of national children’s advocacy, education, and civil rights organizations. The insights from these films illuminate how students are grappling with the intersection between school climate and respect for diversity and can help mentors open up communication with their mentees about these critical social and psychological challenges.

    AUDIENCE: All

    Academy Award–winning documentary filmmaker DEBRA CHASNOFF is a national leader in the movement to create safe schools by teaching children about difference and diversity. She is president of GroundSpark, a filmmaking, education, and advocacy non-profit organization. Debra has received numerous filmmaking awards as well as recognition for her safe schools work including the Pathfinder Award from the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, and a Lifetime Achievement Award in Documentary Filmmaking from her alma mater, Wellesley College.  

     

    Morning 2.5 Hour Workshop Sessions: 10:05 am – 12:30 pm

     

    You Can Do More: Research and Resources to Better Serve LGBTQ Youth in Your Mentoring Program with Christian Rummell, American Institutes for Research

    Many Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (LGBTQ) youth face intense obstacles as they come out and share their identity with others. Bullying and harassment in schools, challenges with parental and peer acceptance, and heightened risks for depression and suicide are unfortunate reminders of a group of young people in need of support. Although these obstacles exist, many youth advocates, including mentoring programs and mentors do not know how to help. This session will provide participants with awareness of the risk factors facing LGBTQ youth, research on how mentors can make a difference, and targeted and updated resources that can create inclusive and supportive opportunities for this population.

    AUDIENCE: Experienced in the Field and Expert in the Field

    DR. CHRISTIAN RUMMELL has spent the last twenty years advocating for marginalized and special populations of youth as a researcher, training consultant, and mentor program manager. As a research scholar at Portland State’s Center for Interdisciplinary Mentoring Research, Christian wrote his dissertation on formal mentoring relationships for gay youth. Christian also served as the Director of Training and Technical Assistance at MENTOR and the AmeriCorps Program Director at the “I Have a Dream” Foundation. He is currently a Senior Researcher at American Institutes for Research.

     

    Training New Mentors with Judy Taylor, CARS

    Are you conducting mentor training at your program? There is more to delivering an effective mentor training session than just sharing information. This session addresses what it takes to pull off an effective mentor training experience, including preparation, subject selection, delivery options and exercises, and follow up considerations. Leave with information and tools useful for helping you meet the challenge of becoming a great mentor trainer.

    AUDIENCE: Early in the Field

    JUDY STROTHER TAYLOR, Executive Vice President of MMS, has over 40 years of experience in adult and youth mentoring, human development, delinquency prevention and juvenile justice. Judy currently works with Evaluation, Management and Training, Inc., where she directed the Mentoring Resource Center, a nationwide contract. Judy has provided technical assistance to over 100 mentoring programs. She is the author of Training New Mentees for the U.S. Department of Justice, distributed by the National Mentoring Center. Judy is also Matthew’s Mentor.

     

    Preparing to Mentor Adjudicated Youth with Clara Carter, Management Consultant Services

    Youth involved in the Juvenile Justice System are, in many ways, like other youth served by mentoring programs. Their lives also include risk factors such as poverty, school failure and inadequate or inconsistent parenting. However their ability to cope with the stigma that comes with involvement in the criminal justice system makes them members of a unique targeted population for mentoring programs. A challenge for program staff is to strike a balance between giving mentors realistic expectations in presenting circumstances and the possible difficulties that come with the territory of working with at-risk young people, while presenting this task as also hopeful and rewarding. This workshop has been carefully designed to be delivered in a way that maintains that balance. The topics covered will include human development, family dynamics, risk and protective factors in the lives of adjudicated youth.

    AUDIENCE: Early in the Field and Experienced in the Field

    DR. CLARA CARTER, President of Management Consultant Services and a Certified SAFE Trainer, provides technical assistance to youth programs. As the former Director of Training for Maryland Mentoring Partnership, she was instrumental in assisting the state to emerge as a leader in the mentoring movement, an integral component of the state’s social fabric. Recognized as an expert, she is a presenter at numerous conferences. Currently, Clara is coordinating a middle school program sponsored by the United Way of Central Maryland and Procter and Gamble Corporation. 

     

    Mentoring Youth Who May Have Experienced Trauma with Laurie Vargas and Leslie Hu, San Francisco Unified School District Mentoring for Success

    Our youth live in diverse environments and may have experienced a traumatic event in their short lives. Trauma can have a profound effect on a child/adolescent’s brain and how the environment interacts with the child/adolescent can impact the healing process. A child/adolescent who has experienced multiple traumas may have a difficult time regulating their emotional response. Children and adolescents respond to trauma differently than adults do. During this session, we will review what trauma is, provide an understanding to how trauma effects brain development, and provide strategies that mentors can use with their young person that can promote a healing environment.

    AUDIENCE: All

    LESLIE HU, MSW, has been a school social worker for the past seven years in San Francisco Unified School District. She loves mentoring and loves talking trauma. 

    LAURIE VARGAS, M.S., PPSC has been a School Social Worker with San Francisco Unified School District for over eight years. She has a depth of experience in mentoring, program management, volunteer management, professional development, database and evaluation systems, mental health and family services. Since 2010 Ms. Vargas has brought a breadth of clinical and professional development experience to the Mentoring For Success program as a District Coordinator and to the San Francisco Mentor Coalition as its moderator.

     

    Morning 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 10:05 am – 11:15 am

     

    Youth Initiated Mentoring: Teaching Youth to Identify, Recruit, and Draw Upon Adult Support with Sarah Schwartz and Stella Kanchewa, Center for Evidenced Based Mentoring

    Youth Initiated Mentoring (YIM) is a new model of mentoring in which youth recruit mentors from within their existing social network. Data from the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program indicates that YIM is a promising strategy to support vulnerable adolescents, potentially creating more enduring and ecologically valid mentoring relationships, while mobilizing internal social capital within communities. Moreover, the model may allow youth to acquire the skills to be able to recruit mentors throughout their lives. In this session, researchers will present the results of a national, 3-year study of YIM in the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program. They will also share preliminary data on an adaptation of Youth Initiated Mentoring, consisting of an eight-week group intervention designed to teach youth how to identify, recruit, and draw on the support of caring adults and mentors. Implications for mentoring programs, including how strategies and principles of YIM can be integrated into traditional mentoring programs, will be explored.

    AUDIENCE: Experienced in the Field and Expert in the Field

    SARAH SCHWARTZ, PhD is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the MacArthur Foundation Connected Learning Research Network. Her research focuses on school- and community-based prevention programs for vulnerable youth. She has authored a number of papers on youth mentoring, including studies of school-based mentoring as well as of youth initiated mentoring, a new model of mentoring in which youth recruit mentors from their existing social networks. 

    STELLA KANCHEWA, MA is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology Ph.D. program at the University of Massachusetts-Boston, studying under the mentorship of Jean Rhodes. Stella’s research focuses on risk and resiliency in adolescence and youth mentoring relationships. She has authored papers on topics related to youth mentoring, including the role of same- versus cross-gender relationships.

     

    Morning 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 11:20 am – 12:30 pm

     

    Teaching and Advocacy in Mentoring: Emerging Practices of the OJJDP Mentoring Enhancement Demonstration Program with Tom Keller and Kay Logan, Portland State University

    The Mentoring Enhancement Demonstration Program (MEDP) funded in 2012 by the Library of Congress for the U.S. Department of Justice/Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention includes ten collaborative partnerships (a total of 32 mentoring program sites) that were selected to implement new strategies that included: (1) incorporating advocacy or teaching roles for mentors; (2) providing targeted pre-match and ongoing training to mentors to support advocacy and teaching; and (3) providing ongoing support to mentors around enhanced mentor roles. American Institutes for Research (AIR) and its partners are conducting a five-year randomized controlled study of MEDP. In this workshop we will discuss the way in which the collaborative sites are defining advocacy and teaching activities for mentors and their different approaches to enhance the teaching and advocacy roles of mentors. We also highlight the lessons and implications of these innovations as they are put into program practice. 

    AUDIENCE: All

    THOMAS KELLER, Ph.D., holds the Duncan & Cindy Campbell Endowed Chair focusing on youth mentoring in the Portland State University School of Social Work. He also directs the Center for Interdisciplinary Mentoring Research and the Summer Institute on Youth Mentoring. Professor Keller conducts research on the development of mentoring relationships and the enhancement of youth mentoring program practices. He also has direct practice experience working for several years within a Big Brothers Big Sisters program. 

     

    Lunch Keynote Presentation: 12:40 pm – 1:50 pm

     

    How to Culturally Tailor Mentoring Programs to Better Serve Youth of Color with Bernadette Sanchez, Ph.D.

    The purpose of this presentation is to equip mentors and staff with strategies for becoming attuned to race, ethnicity and culture of their youth. Research shows that youth of color are less likely to report natural mentors in their lives compared to White youth, and as such, mentoring programs are developed to compensate for these lack of mentors. Given that many mentoring programs serve racially/ethnically diverse youth, it is important to think about what aspects of race/ethnicity matter. Dr. Sanchez will discuss two ways in which mentoring staff can culturally tailor their programs to meet the needs of racially/ethnically diverse youth: by making surface structure and deep structure adaptations. Dr. Sanchez will also provide examples of each. Making these adaptations will be a first step in creating positive changes in our youth.

    AUDIENCE: All

    BERNADETTE SÁNCHEZ earned her PhD at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in Community and Prevention Research. She is currently an Associate Professor of Community Psychology at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois. She conducts both qualitative and quantitative research to understand the role of mentoring in the positive development of urban, low-income youth of color. She is particularly interested in the roles that race, ethnicity, and culture play in youth mentoring relationships and programs. In addition to her research, she also works with community based organizations to enhance their mentoring programs and to conduct program evaluation. 

     

    Afternoon 2.5 Hour Workshop Sessions: 2:00 – 4:25 pm

     

    Tools and Tips for Developing Group Mentoring with Jerry Sherk, CARS

    This workshop will provide an overview of how to design, implement, and facilitate a group mentoring program. The trainer will begin by describing the two basic models for group mentoring – formal and informal. While focusing on formal group mentoring, the facilitator will address the matching process for mentors and mentees, and developing group rules. He will also explain “the flow of activities” concept for a curriculum-based effort, and how to put together an activity plan for each session. Examples of specific group mentoring curriculum will be provided, including an effective sharing process called “Good News/Bad News.” Participants will leave this workshop with a better understanding of how to put together a group mentoring effort, and how to prepare mentors to be successful when working with this model.

    AUDIENCE: All

    JERRY SHERK, M.A., is the owner/operater Mentor Management Systems, of Encinitas, California.   A former school counselor, Jerry has worked with hundreds of youth mentoring programs over the past 15 years.   Jerry’s expertise includes: staff, mentor, and mentee trainings; developing training materials; creating policy and procedure manuals; supporting regional mentoring coalitions; juvenile justice mentoring, foster youth mentoring, reentry mentoring; group mentoring; and working with employee-to-employee mentoring programs. In a past career, Jerry played 12 years for the NFL’s Cleveland Browns.

     

    Empowering Mentees for Successful Matches with Dustianne North, CARS

    It is common, even in the most sophisticated mentor programs, to focus on training mentors but seldom extend the same attention to orienting and preparing mentees. To ensure that mentees in your program feel empowered and can contribute to the success of their matches, establishing a connection with them early on – and continuing to communicate with them throughout their matches – are critical. There are also, of course, safety reasons to keep open communication between program staff and mentees. We will explore some fun and interactive mentee training activities, agendas, and important topics. We’ll also discuss recruitment, screening, training, matching, supervision, and closure strategies aimed specifically at mentees.

    AUDIENCE: All

    Since 1997, DUSTIANNE NORTH, M.S.W., Ph.D., has provided training and technical assistance to mentoring programs and collaboratives, specializing in those who serve youth in distressed situations. She is also trained in empowerment and organizing strategies at the individual, group, and community levels. Dustianne draws upon all of these experiences to address issues about working directly with youth, as well as program design and interagency partnerships.

     

    Results of Law Enforcement and Community Based Organization Transformative Mentoring Program with John Ducksworth, Fedcap Rehabilitative Services, Inc., and Rosanne Placencia-Knepper, Community Connections for Youth; Panel: Clinton Lacey, Assistant Deputy of Probation, and L. Reed, Probation Officer, New York City; Darren Collins, mentor; and Phillip Richards and Dejohn Smith, mentees

    This presentation will show what can happen for youth and young adults when a traditional law enforcement agency partners with community based organizations to identify non-traditional credible messengers (persons who have had various types of personal contacts with the criminal justice system themselves) to mentor early offenders. The presentation will include case studies, empirical data, best practices, and a panel discussion involving a mentee, mentor, and a senior probation officer.

    AUDIENCE: Early in the Field and Experienced in the Field

    JOHN DUCKSWORTH, MPA, MPS has served in community corrections, private corrections, and faith based community in various program and administrative capacities working in both facility and community with offender and victim populations. Currently he serves as the Project Coordinator of the Fedcap Arches Transformative Mentoring Program.

      

    Afternoon 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 2:00 pm – 3:10 pm

     

    How to Evaluate the Impact of Mentoring: A Case Study with Armando Jinich, Maria Garza, and David Moreno, Peraj Mexico

    Peraj is a mentoring program in Mexico in which junior and senior undergraduate students do community service as mentors of 5th and 6th graders of public schools, during a full school year, meeting twice weekly at the universities. An evaluation instrument was designed and proven to have high reliability for measuring drop-out risk. It was applied using pre and post-test to some 2,000 mentees and 1,000 youth from a control group. The results show a statistically significant decrease in risk for Peraj mentees and an increase for non-mentees. In this presentation we describe both the mentoring program and the methodology used to construct the evaluation instrument and measure its reliability. We also show how the program was designed to combine a number of mentoring strategies that have been proven successful and how it was implemented so as to be easily replicable without losing its strength which is based on accepted best practices.

    AUDIENCE: Experienced in the Field and Expert in the Field

    ARMANDO JINICH was active in teaching and research in Computer Science, moved on to a successful entrepreneurial career establishing a computer business covering all of Latin America, was for some years a theatre producer and is currently a partner and member of the board of several clean energy companies in Mexico. He is the founder and president of Peraj, a mentoring program currently running in 124 campuses in all of Mexico, involving more than 5,000 mentor-mentees.

    MARÍA GARZA received a B.Sc. in Mathematics and a PhD in Computer Science. From 1980 to 2001 she worked as a Researcher in Computer Science at the National University of Mexico (UNAM). From 2001 to 2005 she worked as Director of Statistical Analysis at Mexico´s educational testing agency (CENEVAL). Since 2006 she works as a consultant in educational assessment, data modeling, quantitative evaluation, psychometric analysis, standardized testing and development of educational websites.

    DAVID MORENO has a Bachelor`s Degree in Psychology, an MS in Educational Psychology and Social Processes, and is completing a PhD in Social Psychology. His interests are on how specific characteristics of the social environment (violence, poverty, etc.) affect how people relate to and interpret their social reality. He has done research on youth involvement in criminal activities, violence towards women and police training, among others. He is a consultant on evaluation techniques for Peraj mentoring program.

     

    Dreams Can Come True: Planning for Life After High School with Your Mentor by Your Side with Amy Cannata, Education Northwest

    Would your mentors appreciate tools to help their mentees learn about options for careers and education after high school? Do you have students who are motivated to go to college or technical school but don’t know where to start when faced with a mountain of websites, booklets, and advice? Join us for a multimedia session to explore the elements and attitudes needed for a successful transition from high school. This session will showcase online content, downloadable extension activities, and a planning workbook for mentoring pairs.

    AUDIENCE: All

    AMY CANNATA’s work focuses on providing training for local and national initiatives in the areas of volunteerism, out-of-school time, and mentoring. She assists a diverse group of programs via in-person training, distance learning, and one-on-one coaching. A graduate of the University of Oregon, she has a master’s degree in public affairs. Her passion for youth work stems from her experience researching teen courts and hip-hop youth culture, and serving as an outreach and shelter worker with homeless youth. 

     

    Afternoon 75-Minute Workshop Sessions: 3:15 pm – 4:25 pm

     

    A Research Study of Check & Connect, A Mentoring Program with Nicole Fabrikant, Darcy Cabral, and Carl Sumi, SRI International

    We will outline the Check & Connect mentorship intervention (created by the University of Minnesota’s Institute on Community Integration), including a discussion of how it is different from many traditional mentoring models. We will also discuss our research of Check & Connect, as implemented in a local school district (by us) as part of a study funded by the US Department of Education. The presentation’s two areas of focus will be describing what Check & Connect is (and how it is different from other types of mentoring models), and how we are conducting our research about this mentorship intervention.  We will discuss our research design, the outcomes we are looking at, and how we are measuring these outcomes. The discussion will include considerations we had when choosing our methodology. We will also present some baseline data from first year results, and a discussion of the data. The discussion will include ample time for questions and answers.

    AUDIENCE: Experienced in the Field and Expert in the Field

    NICOLE FABRIKANT, MSW, is a Researcher at SRI International’s Center for Education and Human Services. She is the project director for the U.S. Department of Education funded efficacy study of Check & Connect. Other research activities include being an analyst on the U.S. Department of Education funded Model Demonstration Coordination Center (MDCC). Before joining SRI, Fabrikant worked as a Research Associate at the Center for Behavioral Health Services and Criminal Justice Research.

    DARCY CABRAL, MSW is a Program Coordinator at SRI International’s Center for Education and Human Services. She is the program coordinator for the U.S. Department of Education funded efficacy study of Check & Connect. In addition to her work at SRI International, Ms. Cabral’s research activities include foster care/education research at San Jose State University.  She also conducts relationship building/mentoring workshops in partnership with the Santa Clara County Office of Education. Before joining SRI, Ms. Cabral was the Program Coordinator of the Education Mentor Program in Santa Clara County, California.

    W. CARL SUMI, Ph.D., is a Senior Education Researcher at SRI International’s Center for Education and Human Services. Dr. Sumi is the co-Principle Investigator of the U.S. Department of Education funded efficacy study of Check & Connect. Other research activities include being the co-PI on a U.S. Department of Education funded efficacy study of CBITS, and in the past, co-PI of a U.S. Department of Education funded efficacy study of First Step to Success, and co-director of the National Behavior Research Coordination Center (NBRCC). Before joining SRI, Dr. Sumi was the behavioral specialist for the state of Hawaii and provided consultation and training on evidence-based interventions and positive behavior interventions and supports.

     

    Engaging STEM Professionals as Mentors: Training and Supporting Corporate Volunteers with Camile Stone and Gavin Nesom, We Teach Science

    STEM professionals are an untapped resource of mentors who as caring adults can be strong role models well suited to volunteer in the classroom. The natural connection point in science and math gives volunteers an enthusiasm which is channeled by thoughtful training and ongoing feedback to guide students to see the relevance of STEM outside the classroom. The program director and a seasoned mentor will give strategies to create a systematic and cohesive approach to STEM mentoring with high student satisfaction, high mentor retention, and improved academics. Working with corporations as partners, best practices to train and support industry professionals to become successful mentors, common pitfalls, and strategies for oversight will all be discussed.

    AUDIENCE: Early in the Field 

    CAMILLE STONE is the Program Director for We Teach Science where she oversees the Remote Tutoring and Mentoring Program. She manages school partnerships, mentor recruitment, training, and program execution. Previously, she worked as a teacher for nearly ten years where she also took on key leadership positions and completed her masters. Following teaching she helped schools implement curriculum. She feels passionate about supporting students’ success in all areas of their lives particularly socio-emotional and academic. 

    GAVIN NESOM is a Senior Curriculum Developer at Riverbed Technology Inc.; he creates and teaches technical courses for customers, partners and internal employees.  Prior to Riverbed he started his career in academic physics research where he thoroughly enjoyed mentoring undergraduate and graduate students.  Perhaps it was this memory that led him to We Teach Science to become a mentor and to visit classrooms to supervise hands on science experiments. 

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    AUDIENCE LEVELS

    Early in the Field – mentoring professionals who are either new to mentoring or are starting a new program; this material is designed around the basics

    Experienced in the Field – mentoring professionals who have been working with youth mentoring or youth-serving programs for at least one year; this material goes beyond the basics and explores deeper levels of understanding for the topics listed

    Expert in the Field – mentoring professionals who have been in the field for at least seven years or who have served in a variety of roles within youth mentoring or youth-serving programs; this material requires the ability to process new information and share experiences or knowledge gained from experience

     

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  • Special thanks to our conference supporters Oracle, and the Center for Applied Research Solutions.

    Click here for a complete list of Friends for Youth’s Supporters.

     

                                   oracle-logo                NewCarsLogo

  • LOCATION

    All sessions will be held at presenting sponsor Oracle’s Santa Clara Conference Center, 4030 George Sellon Circle, in Santa Clara. Complimentary shuttle service between the conference hotel, the Biltmore Hotel and Suites and the Oracle Conference Center will be provided on both days. 

    Oracle          OracleSC_Auditorium

     

    ACCOMMODATIONS

    Conference rates at the Biltmore Hotel and Suites, 2151 Laurelwood Road in Santa Clara, are $162 for single/double, $172 for triple, and $182 for quad on Wednesday and Thursday nights plus an additional 9.5% occupancy tax, $1.00 city tax, and $2.00 WEC, per room per night. Reservations may be made by calling 408-988-8411 or 800-255-9925. When making reservations, mention “Friends for Youth” or Booking ID #29607 to get the special group rate. Reservations will be accepted until Wednesday, April 09, 2014, at which time any unreserved guestrooms in our block will be released for general sale and reservation requests will be accepted on a space-available basis at their best available rate.

     

    TRANSPORTATION

    The Oracle Santa Clara Conference Center and Biltmore Hotel and Suites are 5 minutes away from San Jose International Airport (SJC); the conference hotel provides complimentary transportation between SJC and the hotel. Inquire with the hotel for more information when you make your reservation. San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and Oakland Airport (OAK) are each about 30 miles away. Shuttle and taxi service is available from all airports; shuttle and taxi service from both of these airports to the hotel may cost between $70 and $150 one way.

    The conference hotel will also provide complimentary transportation between the hotel and conference center for guests on the days of the conference. More details on shuttle times will be sent with confirmation. 

    Driving directions:

    From San Francisco International Airport (SFO), take 101 South. Take Montague exit (East) toward Agnew Center. Take ramp to Layfayette Street. Turn right onto Lafayette Street. Turn right on Palm Drive into Oracle’s Santa Clara campus.

    From San Jose International Airport (SJC), take 87 North to 101 North. Take Montague exit (East) toward Agnew Center. Take ramp to Layfayette Street. Turn right onto Lafayette Street. Turn right on Palm Drive into Oracle’s Santa Clara campus.

     

    Onsite parking is free at the Oracle Conference Center both days. Look for spaces in the building 22 parking lot, as well as along Palm Drive.

     

    MEALS

    Complimentary breakfast and lunch will be available both days for conference attendees. Vegetarian options are included with all meals; it is not necessary to indicate your preference when registering. We apologize in advance that we are unable to make any other special requests for meals.

     

  • Q: Why is the conference held at an out-of-the-way location and isn’t near much of anything else?

    A: Thanks to the generous donation of their conference center, Oracle provides an opportunity to pay much lower registration fees while enjoying a world-class technology center in a retreat atmosphere with high-quality catered breakfast and lunch (and don’t forget the yummy afternoon snacks!). Registration fees for comparable national conferences are anywhere from double to triple our rates. We appreciate Oracle’s support and pass that generosity down to you!

    While it may take a little more effort to get there (public transportation in that particular part of Silicon Valley is severely lacking) or to stay there (fewer choices of lodging limits our ability for better rates), we hope that you will apply your registration savings to these logistics and join us to relax, refresh, and renew your commitment to this important work of helping more young people have safe and effective mentors. PLEASE NOTE: The Conference Center is only 5 minutes away from San Jose International Airport (SJC) and our conference hotel provides complimentary transportation both to and from SJC and to and from the Conference Center.

     

    Q: Who should attend?

    A: Mentoring professionals from all levels – from executive directors to development officers to program managers to program coordinators – are invited to participate in this interactive conference. In addition, youth-serving and youth development professionals, including those who work with after-school and specialty programs, would benefit from sessions at the conference. 

     

    Q: What is offered?

    A: The annual mentoring conference offers a variety of workshop session that provide intensive and specialized content in basic topics like Mentoring 101Mentor ScreeningMentor Training, and Volunteer Recruitment, as well as more specific content related to other areas in youth mentoring. During our complimentary breakfast and lunch, you will be inspired by our two plenary sessions each day.

     

    Q: Why should I attend?

    A: The conference continues to be a source of inspiration and information to mentoring professionals and we strive to provide workshops that are useful and thought-provoking for the novice as well as those who have been in the field for years. Each workshop description lists its ideal attendee- new/early to the field, intermediate/experienced in the field, or advanced/expert in the field. By attending this conference, you will walk away with tools and strategies to improve your program, educate your staff, and better serve your community.

     

    Q: What do past participants say?

    “Very pertinent information and applicable to my agency. I’m excited to implement these tools!”

    “I attend a lot of conferences and I have learned more today than all the conferences combined.”

    “Very good conference, great info, helpful, practical, and presenters were very warm and helpful.”

    “Thank you! This is my favorite conference and one I look forward to each year.”

    “Very impressed with content at the conference.”

    “I am new to the process and learned so much today!”

    “Each year re-energizes me to be with professionals and hear great presenters. Thanks!”

    “Very well-organized. I most appreciate the useful practical info/tools shared.”

    “This is my fifth year and I find this conference always has ‘take-aways.’ Thanks for a great day!”

    “I always recommend this conference to others.”

     

    Q: How did the annual mentoring conference develop?

    A: Friends for Youth has been a sponsor of the annual Northern California Mentoring Conference since 2000. It has grown over the years to include presenters and participants from not only across California, but also the U.S. and the world. Since 2006, the conference expanded to two days to include a selection of intensive and various workshops and keynote presentations, all based on improving participants’ knowledge of the field’s Recommended Best Practices.

  

                                                                                                             

FFY Short Description

Transforming the lives of at-risk youth through the power of mentoring